messing about in boats

Belated Update

Posted in Boat Building & Maintenance by Joseph Moore on May 12, 2010

I did actually manage to get down to Nervous Tension at the end of last week. The front’s largely fixed, though in desperate need of a healthy dose of epoxy and glass, the bow roller’s back on and all is well once again! I shall say this for the last time: One more day of graft and she’ll be ready for a sail. Bring it on.

What’s Left?

Posted in Boat Building & Maintenance, Sailing by Joseph Moore on March 31, 2010

More for my own records than anything, probably a good idea to take stock of what we achieved at the weekend and what’s left to do. The list now looks a bit like this:

  • Patch a crack in the deck
  • Repair the port quarter under the pushpit base
  • Fill and fair scuffs on the port topside
  • Repair section of starboard bow which has been torn off (on closer inspection – very structural!)
  • Repair area of damp wood from a previous repair on starboard bow
  • Rebuild missing section of starboard transom
  • Repair transom crossbeam (now removed from boat)
  • Figure out where the water in the bilge is coming from
  • Repair stringers on port side
  • Refit bow roller
  • Reattach deck to stringers on port side (previous owner compressed her a little trying to get her off the beach)

That’s right folks, it’s a typical boat to-do list and gets longer every time you look at it!

Repair Progress

Posted in Boat Building & Maintenance, Sailing by Joseph Moore on March 29, 2010

Had a cracking weekend at Southsea marina working on Nervous Tension. As always, boat fixing seems to take much, much longer than you could possibly anticipate but the good news is that the hole in the transom is now watertight! It’s not pretty, but it’s sound and will stop her getting any wetter. Same for the port topside which has had the scuffs filled with a super-bog mix of epoxy, microfibres and some home made chopped strand glass made by cutting up some 450g biax.

Still plenty to do including refitting the bow roller which is currently in the back of the Land Rover along with the br0ken transom crossbeam and doing some serious damp wood replacement and glassing on the foredeck well. I’m still debating actually just removing the well altogether and decking over it. I’m not really sure what purpose it serves; you couldn’t stow a sail in there to avoid windage and you definitely couldn’t stow an anchor and chain in there. It’s most likely to result in scooping up buckets of water in rough weather, but as she’s lasted 35 years in her current setup so until I’ve been for a proper sail I’m not going to fiddle with it.

Was largely hopeless at taking photos, but grabbed a few of Stu running around with the paint roller just before we departed the marina.

Damaged rear quarter where the stanchion has pushed through the deck

Damaged rear quarter where the stanchion has pushed through the deck

A boat full of junk - note the transom crossbeam has been removed

A boat full of junk - note the transom crossbeam has been removed

Damage to starboard topside at foredeck well

Damage to starboard topside at foredeck well

Filled scuffs on port topside - still waiting to be faired

Filled scuffs on port topside - still waiting to be faired


And one very pretty SHE 27 berthed next to us…

SHE 27

SHE 27

Best Laid Plans…

Posted in Sailing by Joseph Moore on March 16, 2010

I was planning on making the most of the dry, sunny weather lately and get some much needed repairs done on Nervous Tension. It was all fairly straightforward; leave early, pick up an outboard on the way and get down in time for high tide to motor her into Southsea marina where – with the help of electricity, shelter and hot showers – the repairs would be easier to make.

As with all these things, it never goes smoothly. Horrible traffic on the M25 and an outboard that just wasn’t having it soon put an end to any hopes of getting into Southsea. Huge thanks go to Chris who was storing some of Nervous Tension’s gear and his kind loan of an old seagull to get my little inflatable out to the boat. On the plus side, the rudder’s now hung back on the transom so she’s sitting much more happily on the mooring.

There’s still a lot of work to be done to get her sailing though at least most of it is fairly simple work, just a bit time consuming.

  • Patch a crack in the deck
  • Repair the port quarter under the pushpit base
  • Fill and fair scuffs on the port topside
  • Repair section of starboard bow which has been torn off (not structural!)
  • Rebuild missing section of starboard transom
  • Repair transom crossbeam
  • Figure out where the water in the bilge is coming from

It’ll be good to get the holes patched up and go for a sail. Then if she behaves herself maybe she can have a new coat of paint at the end of the season.

Fairing The Rudders

Posted in Sailing by Joseph Moore on September 28, 2009

Although in pretty good shape, the rudders on my Inter 18 needed a bit of a clean up. One of them had been filled and faired previously, but the filler was standing proud and quite rough. The other had some nasty tar-like substance caked onto it. Not fast!

Inter 18 Rudders

Inter 18 Rudders

The factory gelcoat on the rudders is tough stuff and despite some chips and these bits stuck to it was still quite smooth; they definitely didn’t need rubbing down and repainting so out comes the trusty steel knife to shave off the muck. Sandpaper never really works for these jobs – it’s hard to get it flat without rubbing down the gelcoat as well. Besides, the gelcoat is smooth enough that nothing ever really sticks to it properly. The filler and the tar muck scraped off easily enough.

I’m not really sure what the filler was covering, aside from a few small scratches there aren’t any depressions or repairs to be seen underneath. Maybe someone ended up spilling a bit on there by mistake and tried to sand it back off. Who knows.

So aside from a couple of chips we’re good to go. Doesn’t seem much point in getting out the filler for such a small job so they can stay as they are until the hulls get a good fairing over the winter I think.